New Design of UK Pound Sterling Coins

2008 Pound Sterling CoinPound Sterling Coins

イギリス造幣局(The Royal Mint)は1968年ぶりに硬貨のデザインを刷新、その流通が2008年に始まった。イギリスの硬貨は、1ペニー、2ペンス、5ペンス、10ペンス、20ペンス、50ペンス、1ポンド、2ポンドの8種類で、2ポンドを除く7種類に新しいデザインが登場。昨年からお財布の中に見つけたら取っておいて、全種類集めたらブログで書こうと思っていたのだが、2ペンス硬貨だけがなかなか手に入らない。先日ようやく最後の1枚をゲットした。新デザイン募集の告知は2005年8月に出され、4000もの応募の中から選ばれたのは、26歳のロンドン在住グラフィック・デザイナー、Matthew Dent氏の作品。「the Royal Arms(英国の紋章)」がモチーフのこの新硬貨は、1ポンド硬貨に紋章を、そして1〜50ペンス6枚を並べると紋章の全体像見えると言う洒落たデザインだ。ちなみに反対側に変更はなく、女王の頭部が描かれている。

ちなみにイギリスの通貨は「UKポンド(UK pound)」又は「ポンドスターリング(Pound Sterling)」で、国際通貨コードは、GBP。日本では、何故かオランダ語読みで「ポンド」と呼ばれているが、イギリスでの発音は「パウンド」である。ポンドという名称は、かつて1トロイポンドの高純度の銀を通貨単位として使用していたことに由来する。通貨記号は「£」だが、これは、ポンドの旧名称が「libra」(ラテン語で天秤)であったため、「L」の筆記体からきた。補助単位はペニー(penny)、複数形はペンス(pence)で、1ポンド=100ペンス。ちなみに、スラングでは、ペニー/ペンスは数字+P(ピー)、ポンドはQuid(見返りとか代償という意味のラテン語の「Quid Pro Quo」に由来)。また良く聞くのは、5ポンドはfiver(ファイバー)、10ポンドはtenner(テナー)。1000ポンドはgrand(グランド)/Gと呼ばれ、お給料や高額のものを指す時に使われる。

The Royal Mint renewed the design of the UK coins which hadn’t been changed since 1968, and its circulation has started in 2008. There are 8 kinds of coins in UK (1 penny, 2 pence, 5 pence, 10 pence, 50 pence, 1 pound, and 2 pounds), and the seven except the 2 pounds coin were redesigned. I have been collecting the new coins one by one from the change I got, but it had been months to find 2p coin (maybe it’s not much circulating yet). But finally I got it recently!! The open competition for a new design was publicised in August 2005, and among 4,000 entries, Mr. Matthew Dent, 26-year-old graphic designer who live in London, won the competition. The new design employs the Royal Arms, and its whole has been split among all six denominations from the 1p to the 50p, with the £1 coin displaying its entirety. The new design is elegant and sophisticated, using an old traditional motif with modern twist. The other side of the coins is the same Queen’s head.

The currency of UK is the pound sterling or often simply called the pound, and its ISO code is GBP. The name ‘pound‘ came from the fact that £1 worth of silver coins were a troy pound in mass for a long time. The pound sign ‘£’ derives from the blackletter ‘L’, an abbreviation of Librae in Roman £sd units (librae, solidi, denarii) used for pounds. The decimal is penny/pence (plural), and £1 = 100p. In a slang, penny/pence is called number + P, and a pound is ‘quid’ (likely from the Latin phrase ‘Quid pro quo‘ meaning an exchange of goods). £5 is often called ‘fiver’, and ‘tenner’ for £10. Grand/G (£100) is quite common when you talk about a salary or a real estate.

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2 responses to “New Design of UK Pound Sterling Coins

  1. everydaylifestyle

    Hi! Thanks for your comment. Good question, but I am not currency expert and can’t explain about the system. What I found from Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pound_sterling) is, Pound sterling has long history and once was the most important currency during British empire, and British are very proud of their currency and have a great attachment to it. For my opinion, they should join Euro. If they want to be a important member of EU – you can’t take only advantages from the membership (British buying homes all over mediterranean countries is one visible thing), you should also share pain as well. But British don’t consider themselves European and don’t want use Euro as well. If they don’t like Europe (there are full of anti-EU articles in media), they shouldn’t stay in EU, to my opinion.

  2. Anonymous

    i have a questions. What is the whole uk money system in the point of view of an American? for example what would i pound be to a dollar. Or why do they have coins and money

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